Mothers Behind Bars: A state-by-state report card and analysis of federal policies on conditions of confinement for pregnant and parenting women and the effect on their children

This PDF file came across my desk and got to say, I was stunned. There is a lot I could say but would much rather y’all take a look at a process that I call, for lack of a better title, The Trail of Tears. Start with the jail booking followed with the time line of a jail birth in the Alachua county jail (Business as Usual ). Know that Alachua is not a good old boy southern county but a county were the economic engines are the University of Florida and Santa Fe College as well as medicine and government. Then go to the voices section and read a mother’s story (A Mother’s Story). and you will have a fine picture of how the intellectual and somewhat academic report translates in the reality of a cultural dysfunction.

A state-by-state report card and analysis of federal policies on conditions of confinement for pregnant and parenting women and the effect on their children

    PRENATAL CARE: Thirty-eight states received failing grades (D/F) for their failure to institute adequate policies, or any policies at all, requiring that incarcerated pregnant women receive adequate prenatal care, despite the fact that many women in prison have higher-risk pregnancies.

    1. Forty-three states do not require medical examinations as a component of prenatal care.
    
    2. Forty-one states do not require prenatal nutrition counseling or the provision of appropriate nutrition to incarcerated pregnant women.

    3. Thirty-four states do not require screening and treatment for women with high risk pregnancies.
    
    4. Forty-eight states do not offer pregnant women screening for HIV.
    
    5. Forty-five states do not offer pregnant women advice on activity levels and safety during their pregnancies.
    
    6. Forty-four states do not make advance arrangements for deliveries with particular hospitals.
    
    6. Forty-nine states fail to report all incarcerated women’s pregnancies and their outcomes.
    
    SHACKLING: Thirty-six states received failing grades (D/F) for their failure to comprehensively limit, or limit at all, the use of restraints on pregnant women during transportation, labor and delivery and postpartum recuperation.

    There has been a recent increase in states adopting laws that address shackling, now totaling ten. Of the states without laws to address shackling:Twenty-two states either have no policy at all addressing when restraints can be used on pregnant women or have a policy which allows for the use of dangerous leg irons or waist chains.

    Here is the full report: Mothers Behind Bars 2010

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One Response to Mothers Behind Bars: A state-by-state report card and analysis of federal policies on conditions of confinement for pregnant and parenting women and the effect on their children

  1. sandi says:

    Here is our bill before the legislature in CA.
    I think we need to include removing shackles during the death process, too.
    Janet Neopoli the Head of Homeland Security knew full well that women in prison were being shackled to bences and left in the sun to die…..and she is now in charge of homeland security…..do we have the right to torture?
    AB 568 protects the safety of pregnant women and protects counties and the state from potential liability by requiring that pregnant women be restrained in the least restrictive way possible, consistent with the legitimate security needs of each woman.
    Posted by Take Action California at 9:45 AM
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    AB 568 protects the safety of pregnant women and protects counties and the state from potential liability by requiring that pregnant women be restrained in the least restrictive way possible, consistent with the legitimate security needs of each woman.

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