Jails and Prisons in 1969

This is the quote from a judge that testified before congress in 1969. I have been in a lot of jails and would like someone to tell me different.

September 18, 1969: In testimony before the Senate Special Subcommittee on Alcohol and Narcotics, Judge Charles W. Halleck of the District of Columbia Court of General Sessions explains why he no longer issues jail sentences to youthful marijuana offenders: “If I send a [long-haired marijuana offender] to jail even for 30 days, Senator, he is going to be the victim of the most brutal type of homosexual, unnatural, perverted assaults and attacks that you can imagine, and anybody who tells you it doesn’t happen in that jail day in and day out is simply not telling you the truth… How in God’s name, Senator, can I send anybody to that jail knowing that? How can I send some poor young kid who gets caught by some zealous policeman who wants to make his record on a narcotics arrest? How can I send that kid to jail? I can’t do it. So I put him on probation or I suspend the sentence and everybody says the judge doesn’t care. The judge doesn’t care about drugs, lets them all go. You simply can’t treat these kinds of people like that.” [Ed: This quote was given in 1969. By repeating it in full, Drug War Chronicle does not intend to imply that any kind of sexual assault is acceptable.]

Jail and prison rape

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