Curbing antibiotics on farms taking too long

This is good case in point on the cold hearted bottom line taking precedent.

Routine use of antibiotics makes some bacteria stronger and resistant to treatment. When those hardier bugs infect a person, antibiotics might no longer work. Last month, federal officials quantified that danger: At least 23,000 people die from antibiotic-resistant bacteria each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which said that’s a conservative figure. That’s why smart doctors resist prescribing antibiotics for every minor ailment.

then there is the dollars

The agriculture industry maintains that the connection is murky between antibiotic use in animals and drug resistance in people. On the other side of the debate is a long list of scientists, public health officials and veterinarians whose views carry more sense and less self-interest. In 2011 alone, 1.9 million pounds of penicillins and 12.3 million pounds of tetracyclines were sold for use in food animals. It’s hard to believe that wouldn’t have an effect.

and this the power of excessive profits in a democratic society

But neither Congress nor the FDA has acted to curtail the broad dangers. The well-financed agriculture industry has won most rounds. And regulators have dragged their feet.

Curbing antibiotics on farms taking too long

Now we have some numbers to hand our hat on”

‘..FEW BLESSINGS of modern science are entirely unmixed, and so it is with the development of powerful synthetic or semi-synthetic opioid analgesics — painkillers such as fentanyl and hydrocodone. Prescribed by the tens of millions in recent years for their power to relieve otherwise crippling pain in the victims of disease and injury, these pills have turned into a $7.3 billion-per-year business. Yet they also pose a major public health risk because of their ready availability and addictiveness to many patients…’

FDA seeks to curb abuse of prescription painkillers

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